Exercise and mental health statistics

Man looking at distant mountains

Mental health is often viewed as an individual responsibility.

However, the environment in which people live can play a large role in mental health and well-being.

This is especially true when it comes to exercise and mental health.

According to recent studies, there is a strong link between exercise and mental health.

In this blog post, we will explore some of the most interesting findings from these studies. Keep reading to learn more!

Table of Contents

Exercise and mental health statistics (Editors Picks)

Mental health and exercise statistics

  • 22.6% of Canadians report having excellent mental health.
  • 98% higher odds of experiencing depression for those with low fitness and muscle strength.
  • A new study shows that 150 minutes of exercise can reduce the risk of depression by 30%.
  • Exercise reduces bad mental health days by 40% on average.
  • Daily physical activity lowers the risk of depression and dementia by 20% to 30%.
  • Exercise Can Reduce Your Mental Health Burden By 11.8% – Study Says.
  • 22% lower risk of depression with moderate to vigorous exercise.
  • Get 30 Minutes of Exercise 3 to 5 Days a Week for Better Mental Health.
  • 30 minutes of exercise makes you more resilient to stress.
  • The antidepressant power of exercise kicks in after 4 to 6 weeks.
  • High-Exercise Group Had 28% of Depression Go Into Remission.
  • Physical exercise is linked to 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health.
  • Exercise for 30 minutes to reduce alcohol cravings by 18.6%.

Student-athlete mental health statistics

  • A new study reveals 35 incidents of suicide among student-athletes.
  • A study finds a significant difference in suicide rates between male and female athletes.
  • The suicide rate among football players is the highest seen in any sport.
  • 10% of college athletes with mental health conditions seek help.
  • 72% of athletic trainers provide treatment for student-athletes in counseling centers.
  • 46% of Trainers Say They Could Provide Better Care with On-Site Mental Health Services.
  • 35% of elite athletes have disordered eating.
  • Only 10% of college athletes with mental health conditions seek care.
  • A new study reveals that 95% of male and 85% of female athletes experience higher stress levels.
  • Depression in college athletes: 1 in 12 reports feeling constantly or every day.
  • A new study shows that 69.7% of college athletes have dealt with a mental illness.
  • 60% of men and 55% of women are unaware of how to access mental health support.
  • Among 50,054 Students, 1.3% Identified Themselves as Elite Athletes.

Swimming and mental health statistics

  • According to the survey, 74% of respondents said swimming helps release stress and tension.
  • According to a survey, 68% of respondents said that being in the water makes them feel good about themselves.
  • According to over 70% of respondents, swimming helps them feel mentally rejuvenated.
  • Swimming has helped 1.4 million Brits with mental health issues.
  • 3.3 million people with mental illness swim regularly in the UK.
  • 60% of swimmers suffer from failure-based depression.
  • New Survey Reveals that 70% of Outdoor Swimmers Believe Their Routine is Essential or Very Important.
  • 38% of swimmers say gratitude for nature is their primary motivation.
  • 85% of swimmers say open water swimming has enhanced their health.
  • 82% of swimmers say open water swimming has enhanced their mental health.
  • 69% of swimmers say open water swimming has enhanced their confidence.
  • 65% of swimmers say open water swimming has enhanced their social interactions.
  • 69% of swimmers say open water swimming has enhanced their physical health.
  • 600 swimmers who experienced trauma found open water swimming positively influenced their mental health.
  • 271 people say Open Water Swimming was good for their confidence.
  • 478 people agree that social connections are a benefit of OWS.
  • More than 50% of swimmers agree that coaching contributes to their success.

Yoga and mental health statistics

  • 24 Women’s Emotional Health Improved After Three Months of Daily Yoga.
  • 10 weeks of yoga relieves depression and improves the quality of life.
  • Following 10 weeks of yoga practice once per week, the participants had fewer symptoms of PTSD. 
  • Sudarshan Kriya is an effective treatment for depression, according to researchers.
  • 14 of 23 studies show yoga reduces depressive symptoms.

Cycling and mental health statistics 

  • 75% of cyclists notice an improvement in their mental health.
  • 87% of cyclists improved their mental health during the coronavirus lockdown.
  • 91% of cyclists recommend cycling for mental health.
  • Over 91% of respondents say off-road cycling is essential for their mental health.
  • Cycling Reduces Stress Levels By A Third, Study Shows.
  • 45% of cyclists see a significant improvement in their sleep.
  • Cycling boosts blood flow to the brain by up to 70%.
  • 17% fewer people who stopped cycling consider their lives worthwhile.

Running and mental health statistics

  • Amateur athletes report 135% less frustration after just 20 minutes of running.
  • 82% of UK runners believe that running helps to clear their minds.
  • 74% of runners have improved mental health and happiness as a result of running.
  • Kids who ran for 30 minutes every morning slept better at night and had improved moods after three weeks.
  • 30 minutes on the treadmill is enough to improve severe depression.
  • Running for 6 months improves brain function by 5.7%.
  • According to a 2010 study, individuals who exercised three days each week for 16 weeks slept an extra 45 minutes each night!
  • After a 6-hour run, our participants reported feeling calm and having an enhanced sense of flow for the first hour of their runs.

Mental health and exercise statistics

Exercise and mental health statistics

Are people who have a higher level of mental well-being more likely to go outside and exercise?

According to the first wave of the Canadian Perspectives Survey Series, 22.6 percent of Canadians aged 15 or older reported having excellent mental health during the survey period.

Additionally, 31.3 percent stated that they had very good mental health, 28.3 percent said they had good mental health, and 17.7% claimed they suffered from fair or poor mental health.

Source: Statistics Canada

98% higher odds of experiencing depression for those with low fitness and muscle strength.

Participants who were classified as having low combined cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength had 98% higher odds of experiencing depression and 60% higher odds of experiencing anxiety.

Source: Medicalnewstoday

The study reveals that being physically active can help prevent mental health issues in adulthood.

Both are true. We conducted a study in 2018 that involved 260,000 people from all over the world.

Physical activity was measured as part of a baseline physical activity assessment for individuals who were free of any mental health condition.

We followed them for an average of 7.5 years, and what we discovered was that those who engaged in the most exercise were 15% less likely to get depression than those who exercised the least.

When individuals performed 150 minutes of moderate and vigorous activity each week, their risk of depressive disorders in the future was reduced by around 30%.

Source: Coachmag

Exercise reduces bad mental health days by 40% on average.

Physical activity may enhance mental health.

A person suffers an average of 3.4 poor mental health days each month, according to researchers.

The amount of bad mental health days among those who exercise decreased by more than 40 percent on average, according to studies.

Source: Uclahealth

Daily physical activity lowers the risk of depression and dementia by 20% to 30%.

According to studies, adults who exercise daily had a 20% to 30% reduced risk of depression and dementia.

Physical activity also appears to lower the likelihood of cognitive deterioration in individuals without dementia.

Source: Mental Health Foundation

Exercise for better mental health?

The number of “bad days” a month for those who exercise regularly is 1.5 fewer than that of people who don’t exercise.

According to the study, people who engaged in any exercise had a minimum reduction of 11.8 percent and a maximum reduction of 22.3 percent in their mental health burden compared to those who did not participate in the exercise.

Source: The Lancet Psychiatry Journal

22% lower risk of depression with moderate to vigorous exercise.

For people who engage in 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise each week, the chance of developing depression is 22% lower than for those who don’t.

Source: Therapyforyou

Get 30 Minutes of Exercise 3 to 5 Days a Week for Better Mental Health.

For three to five days a week, doing 30 minutes or more of exercise may significantly decrease depression or anxiety symptoms.

Source: Mayoclinic

30 minutes of exercise makes you more resilient to stress.

In a group of highly trained, sedentary young men, researchers discovered that individuals who carried out 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity were considerably more resilient to an acute stressor than those who did not exercise in a 2015 study.

Source: NIH, Healthline

Antidepressant power of exercise kicks in after 4 to 6 weeks?

It can take up to four weeks for a physical workout to work, just like with other therapies.

It might take between four and six weeks before the complete antidepressant power of exercise kicks in, and it takes around ten weeks to achieve peak effect.

Source: Psychology Today

High-Exercise Group Had 28% of Depression Go Into Remission.

In the high-exercise group, 28% of participants had their depression go into remission after three months, as opposed to 15% in the low-exercise group.

Source: Psychology Today

Physical exercise is linked to 1.5 fewer days of poor mental health.

The researchers discovered that individuals who exercised had, on average, one and a half fewer days per month of poor mental health than those who did not exercise in a broad study that analyzed physical exercise and mental health in 1.2 million individuals in the United States.

Source: Psychology Today

Exercise for 30 minutes to reduce alcohol cravings by 18.6%?

One research found that individuals with alcohol use disorder who did 30 minutes of light exercise during recovery had an 18.6% reduction in alcohol cravings and a three-fold increase in endorphins.

Source: Ihrsa

Student athlete mental health statistics

Student athletes undoubtedly have a lot on their plates.

Between maintaining high grades, practicing often, and competing in games, it’s no wonder that many student athletes struggle with mental health issues.

In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at some of the mental health statistics associated with student athletes.

Keep reading to learn more!

A new study reveals 35 incidents of suicide among student athletes.

During the 9-year study period, a search of 477 student athletes’ deaths during 3,773,309 individual participant seasons revealed 35 incidents of suicide.

Source: NIH

Exercise and mental health statistics

A study finds a significant difference in suicide rates between male and female athletes.

Male athletes are more likely to commit suicide than female athletes.

In fact, 29 cases of suicide occurred in male athletes, accounting for 82.9% of total cases.

This is compared to 6 cases in female athletes (17.1%).

Source: NIH

Exercise and mental health statistics

The suicide rate among football players is the highest seen in any sport.

The most instances were observed in football players (n = 13), then soccer (n = 5), track/cross-country (n = 5), baseball (n = 4), and swimming (n = 3). In terms of suicide, the highest rate was seen among football athletes.

Source: NIH

10% of college athletes with mental health conditions seek help.

According to Usatoday research, 33% of all university students have significant mental health problems.

According to the survey, 30% of those individuals get help.

However, just 10% of college athletes with mental health issues seek treatment.

Source: Usatoday

72% of athletic trainers provide treatment for student-athletes in counseling centers.

72% of 127 athletic trainers said that they provided treatment for student-athletes in counseling centers that were separate from the athletic training facilities.

Only 20.5% of respondents said that they had a mental health provider who worked in the athletic training room.

Source: Usatoday

46% of Trainers Say They Could Provide Better Care with On-Site Mental Health Services.

According to the report, 46% of trainers said they would be able to provide better care if mental health services were available on-site at athletic centers.

They see students experiencing depression, anxiety, disordered eating, family issues, and sports performance issues.

Source: Usatoday

35% of elite athletes have disordered eating.

Professional and elite athletes, like everyone else, face mental health issues.

According to research, 35% of top athletes suffer from disordered eating, burnout, depression, or anxiety.

A lack of privacy delayed recovery time, and limited control or independence may also contribute to the pressure professional or elite athletes feel.

Source: SAGE Journals

Only 10% of college athletes with mental health conditions seek care.

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, approximately 30% of women and 25% of men who are student-athletes suffer from anxiety.

Only 10% of all college athletes with known mental health issues seek treatment from a mental health professional.

Source: Acsm

A new study reveals that 95% of male and 85% of female athletes experience higher stress levels.

According to statistics, 95% of male athletes and 85% of female athletes report greater stress when compared to 52% of non-athlete pupils.

Athletes reported increased responsibilities, less sleep, and increased extracurricular activity requirements as a result of their training.

Source: Northeastern University

Depression in college athletes: 1 in 12 reports feeling constantly or every day.

According to the NCAA, one in twelve college athletes reported feeling so down that it was difficult for them to function on a daily or almost every day basis.

Source: Christiecampus

A new study shows that 69.7% of college athletes have dealt with a mental illness.

Garrick conducted her own study of 100 student-athletes and discovered that 69.70 percent of them had experienced a mental illness.

That’s almost three out of four athletes. 

Source: Flovolleyball

60% of men and 55% of women are unaware of how to access mental health support.

The NCAA also did a college athlete well-being survey in the fall and spring, during which it monitored the impact of the pandemic on players.

One in 12 college athletes who responded to the poll reported that they felt “constantly” or “nearly every day” so unhappy that it had been difficult to function,

and 60% of males and 55% of females stated they were not aware of how to obtain mental health assistance where they were.  

Source: Christiecampus

Among 50,054 Students, 1.3% Identified Themselves as Elite Athletes.

Among 50,054 pupils, 1.3 percent identified as elite athletes.

Elite male and female athletes had greater mental health in all areas, reporting fewer emotional disorders, less loneliness, higher life satisfaction, more positive emotions, and fewer alcohol problems.

Source: Frontiersin

Swimming and mental health statistics

Do you know that swimming is a great exercise for your body and mind?

In this blog post, we will explore some mental health statistics that show the importance of swimming.

Swimming can help improve mood, reduce stress levels, and even prevent anxiety.

So, if you are looking for a way to boost your mental health, start swimming!

oDUV8 why swimming is great for mental health

Why Swimming is Great for Mental Health?

According to a 2012 survey of over 1,200 swimmers aged 16 to 45 conducted by swimwear manufacturer Speedo, how swimmers felt about their sport. The poll found:

  • According to the survey, 74% of respondents said that swimming helps release stress and tension.
  • According to a survey, 68% of respondents said that being in the water makes them feel good about themselves.
  • Swimming, according to over 70% of respondents, helps them feel mentally rejuvenated.

Source: USMS

Swimming has helped 1.4 million Brits with mental health issues.

Swimming has reduced the symptoms of anxiety and depression for 1.4 million people in the United Kingdom.

Almost 500,000 British adults with mental health issues have reported that swimming has helped them cut down on doctor’s appointments regarding their mental health.

Source: Swimming.org

Swimming and mental health statistics

3.3 million people with mental illness swim regularly in the UK.

Around 3.3 million British adults with mental health issues swim at least once every two to three weeks, according to a YouGov poll.

When it comes to the influence of swimming on their everyday lives, 43 percent of this group of regular swimmers claim it makes them feel happier, 26% are more energized to accomplish daily activities, and 15% think life feels more manageable.

Source: Swimming.org

60% of swimmers suffer from failure-based depression.

After the competition, almost 60% of nationally competitive swimmers exhibited symptoms of failure-based depression in a research study.

These rates were also higher among the top 25% of athletes.

Source: NIH

New Survey Reveals that 70% of Outdoor Swimmers Believe Their Routine is Essential or Very Important.

More than 70% of outdoor swimmers, according to a recent poll, consider their routine essential or very important to their general sense of well-being and contributes significant support to their physical and mental health. 

This is complemented by notable research on hobbies, which revealed that individuals who participate in them were less likely to suffer from stress, low spirits, and depression.

Source: Champsconsult

38% of swimmers say gratitude for nature is their primary motivation.

Swimming for mental health is more than just a method to reduce anxiety.

Outdoor swimming not only enhances our connection with nature and the environment, but it also increases our appreciation for nature and gratitude.

Connecting with nature was identified by 38% of swimmers as their primary motivation for going outside, which leads to feelings of wonder and thanksfulness.

Source: Champsconsult

Swimming and mental health statistics

Swimming in open water has been proven to change your life.

Swimming in open water has enhanced the general health and well-being of swimmers by 85%, mental health by 82%, confidence by 69%, social interactions by 65%, and physical health by 69%.

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

Swimming and mental health statistics

600 swimmers who experienced trauma found open water swimming positively influenced their mental health.

Swimmers who have experienced trauma in their lives also told researchers that open water swimming had a positive influence on their mental health.

Of those who agreed or strongly agreed, 600 (80%) said it benefited their mental health. 459 of them (62%) strongly agreed.

Of the rest, 58 (8%) stated they neither agreed nor disagreed, 16 (2%) disagreed and 62 (8%) strongly disapproved.

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

Swimming and mental health statistics

271 people say Open Water Swimming was good for their confidence.

There were still significant advantages from participating in OWS, with more than half of those polled claiming that the movement had boosted their confidence.

Surprisingly, and like the fitness question, there was a little less certainty about whether they strongly agreed (271, 37%), or merely agreed (229, 31%).

One in five (154, 21%) neither agreed nor disagreed; 72 people actively disagreed (53 of those, or 7%, strongly).

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

478 people agree that social connections are a benefit of OWS.

For many open water swimmers, the relationships that develop are formed in damp mornings, stray swans, fractured ice, numb fingers, scares, shares, and shivers.

478 respondents strongly agreed (39%) or agreed (25%) that social connections and/or friendships have been one of the benefits of OWS.

Some 139 people (19%) neither agreed nor disagreed; 56 people (8%) disagreed while 63 people (9%) did not agree.

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

Open water swim coaching has enabled me to swim with greater confidence.

Almost three-quarters of those who received coaching said it gave them greater confidence, a deeply encouraging figure demonstrating the value of coaching as a means to enable greater participation in the open water swimming.

Some 69 swimmers both strongly agreed (37%) and agreed (37%). By comparison, 9 disagreed (5%) and 14 disagreed (7%), with 27 (14%) neither agreeing nor disagreeing. 

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

Swimming and mental health statistics

Open water swim coaching has enabled me to swim with friends/ form new friendships.

One of the great rewards of open water swimming is the friendships formed on the shore and forged in the water.

Again, for many of the 188 respondents to this question, coaching was a contributing factor.

More than 50% strongly agreed (51, 27%) or agreed (47, 25%).

On the other side, 19 swimmers (10%) disagreed and 17 strongly disagreed.

Of the rest, 54 swimmers (29%) neither agreed nor disagreed. 

Source: Swim for Good (Scottish Swimmer)

Yoga and mental health statistics

Did you know that there are mental health benefits to practicing yoga?

According to recent studies, practicing yoga can help improve mental health in a number of ways.

In this blog post, we will explore some of the most interesting mental health statistics about yoga.

We will also look at how you can start incorporating yoga into your own mental health routine.

So, if you are looking for a holistic way to improve your mental well-being, keep reading!

24 Women’s Emotional Health Improved After Three Months of Daily Yoga.

Another study proved the important impact of yoga on stress by tracking 24 women who felt emotionally overwhelmed.

The ladies had significantly reduced levels of cortisol after a three-month yoga program.

They also experienced less stress, anxiety, tiredness, and depression.

Source: Healthline

10 weeks of yoga relieves depression and improves the quality of life.

Another research with 131 participants revealed that 10 weeks of yoga aided to decrease stress and anxiety while also improving quality of life and mental health.

Source: Healthline

Yoga proven to reduce stress, study says.

In a study of 34 women suffering from an anxiety disorder, yoga sessions twice weekly for two months were given.

Those who practiced yoga had significantly lower levels of anxiety than the control group at the conclusion of the study.

Source: Healthline

At least 52% no longer meet the criteria for PTSD after participating in this study.

Researchers followed 64 women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is characterized by severe anxiety and terror following exposure to a traumatic event.

Following 10 weeks of yoga practice once per week, the participants had fewer symptoms of PTSD.

In fact, at least 52% of individuals no longer met the criteria for PTSD after participating in the study.

Source: Healthline

Sudarshan Kriya is an effective treatment for depression, according to researchers.

In another research, people in alcohol dependence therapy who engaged in Sudarshan Kriya, a certain style of yoga that emphasizes rhythmic breathing, had less depression and cortisol levels after two weeks.

They also had lower levels of ACTH, a hormone that promotes the release of cortisol.

Source: Healthline

More promising outcomes with at least 10 yoga sessions.

In a 2013 review of 22 research (with 1,728 participants) on yoga for anxiety linked to life circumstances, the therapy was beneficial in some cases but not in others.

In general, exercises that included at least ten yoga sessions yielded more promising outcomes.

The studies were of medium to poor quality, therefore firm conclusions about yoga’s effectiveness could not be drawn.    

Source: NIH

14 of 23 studies show yoga reduces depressive symptoms.

In a study of 1,272 individuals with depressive symptoms (but not all diagnosed as having depression), yoga was beneficial in 14 of the 23 studies.

Source: NIH

A new study finds that hatha yoga reduces anxiety symptoms.

The effectiveness of hatha yoga in reducing anxiety symptoms was investigated in a 2018 review of 18 research (1,532 participants) on individuals who had been diagnosed with an anxiety disorder or depression.

It did not appear to be more beneficial than usual therapy or the other therapies evaluated in the studies.

It was also superior to psychoeducation programs at relieving symptoms of depression, according to the research.

The majority of the studies were deemed low-quality.

Source: NIH

Cycling and mental health statistics

Cycling has been shown to have a whole range of health benefits, from improving heart health to increasing muscle strength.

But it’s not just our physical health that can benefit from cycling – our mental health can too!

In this blog post, we’ll take a look at some of the latest statistics on the link between cycling and mental health.

Spoiler alert: the results are pretty impressive! Keep reading to find out more.

75% of cyclists notice an improvement in their mental health.

According to Cycleplan’s research, 75 percent of cyclists noticed an improvement in their mental health after adopting cycling, with 8% claiming it helped with their depression or anxiety.

Source: Bikebiz

87% of cyclists improved their mental health during the coronavirus lockdown.

During the coronavirus lockdown, a survey sponsored by BikeRadar and conducted in conjunction with charity partner CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) found that 87% of cyclists had utilized cycling to improve their mental health.

Source: Bikeradar

91% of cyclists recommend cycling for mental health.

The survey also found that 91% of BikeRader users would recommend cycling to friends and family as a method to enhance or manage mental health.

Source: Bikeradar

Over 91% of respondents say off-road cycling is essential for their mental health.

Cycling UK has published Rides of Way, a survey of over 11,500 off-road cyclists this year.

Off-road cycling was rated as being somewhat more essential for one’s mental health than one’s physical health by an amazing 91 percent of respondents.

Source: Cyclinguk, Cyclescheme

Cycling Reduces Stress Levels By A Third, Study Shows.

According to a survey by Cycleplan, which sought to determine whether cycling improves one’s mental health, three-quarters of respondents noticed an improvement in their emotional wellbeing.

With 8% claiming it helped with their depression or anxiety, a third of the 971 respondents stated that cycling reduced their stress levels and made them feel more relaxed.

Source: Cycleplan

45% of cyclists see a significant improvement in their sleep.

According to a study, 45% of participants noticed a significant improvement in their sleep after starting cycling.

Poor sleeping habits have long been linked to mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, which are two possible reasons why cycling may be so beneficial for people’s mental health.

Source: Cycleplan

Cycling boosts blood flow to the brain by up to 70%.

It’s also been discovered that regular cycling can help protect against dementia and other cognitive impairments in later life.

Blood flow to the brain increased by 28% on average while cycling in a recent study, with blood flow to other areas increasing by as much as 70%.

Source: Cycleplan, NIH

17% fewer people who stopped cycling consider their lives worthwhile.

In comparison to people who continued cycling, those that stopped were 17% less likely to feel their lives were worthwhile.

So get on your bike and enjoy the scenery, sunshine, and good vibes instead of going to the gym.

Source: Britishcycling

Running and mental health statistics

It’s no secret that running is good for your physical health.

But what about your mental health?

It turns out that running can also be great for your mental wellbeing.

In fact, there are many mental health benefits to running.

Keep reading to learn more about why running is good for your mind!

Amateur athletes report 135% less frustration after just 20 minutes of running.

Stubbs’s latest study, which was done on a small group of elite and amateur athletes, revealed that after just 20 minutes of running, significant boosts in brain activity were observed.

The ability to cope with stress improved by up to 29% for the average athletes and relaxation levels increased by up to 18%.

Frustrations decreased by up to 135%, making them less likely to make hasty judgments.

Source: Coachmag

82% of UK runners believe that running helps to clear their minds.

Although many people start running for the physical benefits of the activity, it may also help with your mental health.

According to research conducted by Asics among 14,000 individuals during the pandemic, 82% of UK runners believe that running helps to clear their minds, and 78% feel more sane and in control as a result of it.

Source: Coachmag

74% of runners have improved mental health and happiness as a result of running.

According to a year-long study by England Athletics of over 13,000 individuals in England, 74% of runners have improved their mental health and happiness as a result of running.

And nearly 90% of those runners said that their pleasure had increased as a consequence of participating in group runs, with new friendships and motivation cited as the key reasons.

Source: Metro

Kids who ran for 30 minutes every morning slept better at night and had improved moods after three weeks.

According to a 2012 research of about 50 children, those who ran for 30 minutes in the mornings slept better and had improved moods after three weeks compared to the non-running control group.

Researchers determined that regular exercise should be encouraged to promote good sleep and well-being.

Source: Jahonline, Verywellfit

30 minutes on the treadmill is enough to improve severe depression.

According to research published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 30 minutes on the treadmill is enough to improve someone who suffers from severe depression!

Source: NIH, ORIGYM

Running for 6 months improves brain function by 5.7%.

In fact, a University of Calgary study discovered that running on a regular basis may help improve your cognitive performance as you get older, and the benefits are visible in a few months! 

Regularly jogging and doing other aerobic activities for 6 months improved brain function by 5.7 percent, according to the research.

Verbal fluency also improved significantly, equivalent to being 5 years younger!

Source: Neurology, ORIGYM

45 minutes of extra sleep each night!

According to studies, exercise, such as walking, not only helps you sleep better but also allows you to fall asleep faster!

According to a 2010 study, individuals who exercised three days each week for 16 weeks slept an extra 45 minutes each night!

Source: NIH, ORIGYM

Get the best of both worlds: Sleep and fitness!

The researchers at the John Hopkins Centre for Sleep discovered that moderate exercise increases the amount of deep sleep (or slow-wave) you get.

This is when the body and brain have a chance to rest and rejuvenate, repairing damaged cells and generating new ones!

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine, ORIGYM

The first hour of running is linked with feeling calm and having an enhanced sense of ‘flow’!

According to a study published in the journal Experimental Brain Research, running was linked with reduced activity in the frontal cortex of the brain during a six-hour run.

Additionally, for the first hour of their run, participants reported feeling calm and having an enhanced sense of ‘flow’ compared to when they were resting.

Source: Springer, ORIGYM

Conclusion

Although it is important to take personal responsibility for our mental health, the environment in which we live can play a significant role.

This is especially true when it comes to exercise and mental health. Recent studies have shown that there is a strong link between these two factors.

In this blog post, we explored some of the most interesting findings from these studies.

If you are looking for ways to improve your mental health, consider incorporating more exercise into your daily routine.

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